Tuesday, June 12, 2018

Swimming and Flu



Swimming and Flu

Research has shown that those who practice swimming moderately are less susceptible to influenza than the average person and also swimmers who perform a really hard training are vulnerable to the flu, such as those who do not swim because of the length and strength of the workout that leads to reducing the efficiency of some immune functions for a period of a few hours to a few days. This gives the opportunity for viruses to invade the body. While this is not directly related to the performance of the circulatory system and metabolic processes and muscle performance, but the immune system is very important for every swimmer when there is a weakness in it the swimmer is vulnerable to the flu and when the swimmer is sick he will be unable to perform, training and competition optimally. Fortunately, however, there are many measures that can be taken to significantly reduce the body infection must be done as a habit. The immune system depends heavily on nutrition. The best swimmers in the world know that there is a moderate nutrition and no swimmer in life reached high levels without eating large amounts of vegetables and fruits and a balanced diet that provides the necessary support for the immune system. Sleep is also important to support the immune system. Even moderate sleep deprivation reduces your active activity levels. The average person needs eight hours of sleep a day and the swimmers who perform intensive training need more than this. Grant Hackett, the Australian swimmer in the 1500m freestyle race, is usually ready to sleep at 9 pm every night. Most people think that airborne germs are the main cause of infection. It is possible to have a self-infection, such as when you grab the handles of the infected doors where germs are spread and then rub the eye with the same hand. The good news is that self-infection can be greatly avoided: just keep your hands away from the nose and eyes, and wash them frequently. Using sports drinks can help prevent colds and flu from affecting the swimmers and can you ask how this? Hard training can drain the body stores of glycogen. When this happened the body released (cortisol) in order to convert the muscle proteins so that the amino acid constituents can be converted and used to obtain energy. Thus, consumption of sports drinks the containing carbohydrate during and after training limits this reducing of glycogen depletion, cortisol secretion, and other stress hormones. There are two main objectives: recovery quickly to reduce lost training time. Swimming with cold symptoms is not a big problem and does not affect the performance of training significantly. Exercise does not increase the duration or severity of the cold but I would recommend staying away from the swimming pool until you feel better. Keep those germs to yourself you do not need to pass them around. When the symptoms move to the chest and lungs, the swimmer should Be careful. This is a good advice to take a day off before continuing training. When symptoms of flu, such as fever and body pain increased, do not train at all, training should resume only after the symptoms disappear with one or two days.

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